Four premises

To begin a process of contemplation, one must begin with these four premises. They are self-explanatory.

  1. Life happens in the present, so you don’t have a minute to waste.
  2. The past was meant to be learned from, not to be re-lived in the present. Regrets are useless because you can’t go back and remake the past.
  3. All your experiences and people in your life, whether you see them as good or bad, helped shape who you are today.
  4. You are the only one responsible for changing your current life to the one you want.

Self-Reflection 101 // The Good Men Project

“The truth is that there are two ways in which the future can become obsolete. One is through the inability to imagine the New: in this model, the idea of building a Tower never occurs to us; we are content to stay on the ground. The other happens when the New becomes so perpetual and unrelenting, when the construction of the Tower becomes so consuming, that we no longer have the luxury or the inclination to look up… You cannot have a future without a sense of the past, and there is no quicker way to make both obsolete than by insisting on the urgency and the singularity of the present.”

— Meghan O’Gieblyn on deep time and Long Now’s 10,000-year clock (via Erica Avey)